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Part IV: White Tears in Urban Schools–from a White Woman’s Perspective

Since 2017, I have written a few articles focused on White tears.  Specifically those of White women and the ways in which school leaders, managers, coaches, and staff respond to them, particularly when the response obstructs focusing on the needs of Black students in urban schools. So far, this has been a three part series; this article is Part IV.…

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Grief in Urban Schools: from a School Leader’s Perspective

The following is an excerpt from an untitled and unpublished novel. This is a work of realistic fiction. All names, characters, places, and experiences are either of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual people, living or dead, places, or occurrences is completely coincidental. Please be advised that this writing includes material that could be considered…

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White Tears Part III: White Educators Ask Questions About What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools

In November, I wrote the article Black Educators Share Their Thoughts on What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools. Then, in January I shared a 2nd article in which Black education leaders shared DIFFERENT views on white tears. In my conversations with educators, I am learning that in order to change the way we lead, coach, mentor, and manage…

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White Tears Part II: Black Education Leaders Share Alternate Ways to View What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools

            Being in urban education is hard work.  Some might say that being an education leader in an urban environment is even harder work.  To further emphasize this reality, the Hechinger Report highlights the locus of responsibility for teachers and school leaders: A 2009 study by New Leaders for New Schools found that more than half of a school’s…

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What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools?

In November, I wrote an article called Black Educators Share Their Thoughts on What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools.  Since then, I’ve received a number of responses to the content and was notified recently that the article was posted on a colleague’s blog and viewed over 12,000 times.  That’s pretty exciting! That number of views also suggests that there…

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“It’s Time for Us White People to Pay Reparations.”: A 15-year-old African American Teen Shares Her Thoughts on Reparations and White Privilege

  Please listen to this poem from Jordan, a 15-year old African American female student.   A few days ago Jordan was engaged in a conversation with her peers. One of the students made a comment about White privilege. 15-year-olds.  I don’t think my friends and I talked about race when I was 15, but that was quite some time…

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White Tears Part I: Black Educators Share Their Thoughts on What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools

In a recent article, Zachary Wright, a high school teacher, wrote As a White male teacher, whose goals are to not only teach, but also learn from my students, I need to be aware of, and need to name, the privilege that inevitably blinds me from truly understanding what it means to be Black in America. Thank you, Mr. Wright. 🙂…

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I’m Not Black. I’m O.J.: How Understanding Privilege Can Help to Disrupt Inequity

  If you have ever done a privilege walk, you know it can be a very moving, and sometimes emotional, visual of how some of us have been given opportunities and head starts and others of us have not.  In the video above, the narrator tells participants to take two steps forward if 1) both of your parents are still…

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Let's Talk About It, Urban Education

Hundreds of Black Male Educators Convene in Philadelphia: A Black Woman’s Reflections

This weekend I had the opportunity to attend the first national gathering of Black Male Educators Convenings (BMEC) in Philadelphia. I was both inspired and challenged. In sacred spaces like the convening, where Black men are often coming from schools and places that are predominately female and White, I try to think carefully about my presence, both in simply being…

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