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Black Education Leaders Share Alternate Ways to View What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools

            Being in urban education is hard work.  Some might say that being an education leader in an urban environment is even harder work.  To further emphasize this reality, the Hechinger Report highlights the locus of responsibility for teachers and school leaders: A 2009 study by New Leaders for New Schools found that more than half of a school’s…

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Part 2: What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools?

In November, I wrote an article called Black Educators Share Their Thoughts on What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools.  Since then, I’ve received a number of responses to the content and was notified recently that the article was posted on a colleague’s blog and viewed over 12,000 times.  That’s pretty exciting! That number of views also suggests that there…

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“It’s Time for Us White People to Pay Reparations.”: A 15-year-old African American Teen Shares Her Thoughts on Reparations and White Privilege

  Please listen to this poem from Jordan, a 15-year old African American female student.   A few days ago Jordan was engaged in a conversation with her peers. One of the students made a comment about White privilege. 15-year-olds.  I don’t think my friends and I talked about race when I was 15, but that was quite some time…

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Black Educators Share Their Thoughts on What Happens When White Women Cry in Schools

In a recent article, Zachary Wright, a high school teacher, wrote As a White male teacher, whose goals are to not only teach, but also learn from my students, I need to be aware of, and need to name, the privilege that inevitably blinds me from truly understanding what it means to be Black in America. Thank you, Mr. Wright. 🙂…

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I’m Not Black. I’m O.J.: How Understanding Privilege Can Help to Disrupt Inequity

  If you have ever done a privilege walk, you know it can be a very moving, and sometimes emotional, visual of how some of us have been given opportunities and head starts and others of us have not.  In the video above, the narrator tells participants to take two steps forward if 1) both of your parents are still…

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Let's Talk About It, Urban Education

Hundreds of Black Male Educators Convene in Philadelphia: A Black Woman’s Reflections

This weekend I had the opportunity to attend the first national gathering of Black Male Educators Convenings (BMEC) in Philadelphia. I was both inspired and challenged. In sacred spaces like the convening, where Black men are often coming from schools and places that are predominately female and White, I try to think carefully about my presence, both in simply being…

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Let's Talk About It, Urban Education

Is the Road to Special Education (for Black Boys) Paved with the White Educator’s Paperwork?

Many studies note that there is an over identification of Black boys to special education.  While serving as the Teach For America Vice President with Teacher Leadership Development in Greater Philadelphia, I had the opportunity to spend time in classes in Trenton, Camden, and Philadelphia.  In this role, I saw 3rd grade special education classes that were 100% Black males…

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Let's Talk About It, Urban Education

How to Facilitate Award Winning Professional Development

Imagine that a teacher comes to a workshop and says he is struggling to get his students to learn calculus. He describes them as resistant, unmotivated, and chatty. But wait a minute. An hour later, he tells the room that his students should be grateful to have him, that he drives 45 minutes each way, and that he is highly…

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Let's Talk About It, Urban Education

Are Schools Seeking Black Overseers to Control Black Students?

The article below is based on interviews with several Black male educators who work in urban school settings on the east coast. In an effort to honor the perspectives of those participating in the interviews, several of them created the title for this article.  I often think one of the best questions to ask ourselves is, “What am I learning…

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